The Farmer’s Daughter

The Farmer’s Daughter

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Wicked Work

Barbed wire shaped the West. Now it shapes the artwork of father-daughter duo Bob Inabnit and Jill Lorang.
“I’ve always liked barbed wire. There’s history there,” says Lorang. “It’s a cool medium to use.”
In the early 2000s, she and her father were tearing down a rusted fence on the family farm at Ledger. It struck them that they could repurpose the barbed wire for home and yard décor.
“It’s wicked to work with. You have to be up on your tetanus,” laughs Lorang, “but it makes each piece unique.”
Using rusted barbed wire, scrap metal, old barnwood, and other remnants discovered on the farm, Lorang and her father have created cowboy hats, baskets, wall sconces, and more. They have become well-known for their barbed wire trees (which range in height from ten inches to seven feet), and they were honored to create a barbed wire buffalo skull for The Russell Auction in Great Falls.
“We’ve made all sorts of fun things. Our repeat customers enjoy the rustic, handcrafted look of our work,” says Lorang.
She explains that this venture began simply as a bonding experience between father and daughter, but has grown into a popular Western décor business. Naming their enterprise came naturally; what could be more fitting than The Farmer’s Daughter?
For more information, visit mtfarmersdaughter.com or their store on Etsy.